Tone of Voice

Tone of Voice carries an incredible amount of emotional clues. Using video examples and visual diagrams that track the intonation (the high and low pitches) of various phrases, students will learn to capture the feelings that are carried through the voice to help them detect sarcasm, humor, level of interest, and emotional states.

Sample Video:

Emotion ID III

EXTENSION LESSON – This is the third edition of the Emotion ID series. In this game, we try to figure out how each of our characters is feeling. We go through three steps each time: How did their face look? How did their voice sound? What message did their words send? See if you can get them all right!

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Transcript:

Narrator: Welcome to Emotion ID, a game where you have to guess how each person is feeling. To figure out how someone is feeling, we use all the clues they give us. We focus on: (1) their facial expression – how do they look? Can we tell how they feel?; (2) their tone of voice – how their voice sounds; (3) and the words they say – what message do their words send? After we hear from each person, we’ll stop and discuss all of the clues that help us figure out what emotion they are feeling.

 

Let’s get started! Round one. Watch Jack and decide how he’s feeling.

 

Jack: My teacher keeps telling me to do my work but I don’t want to do my work! I want to play on the computer! Why won’t she let me do what I want to do? I don’t want to do any work!

 

Narrator: How does Jack feel? Let’s look at the clues. Let’s start by looking at his facial expression. His eyes are squinting, his eyebrows are scrunched together, and his head is looking down. How do you think his facial expression looks? Now, let’s listen and focus on his tone of voice. Is his voice high or low? Loud or soft?

 

Jack: (internal thought) My teacher keeps telling me to do my work but I don’t want to do my work! I want to play on the computer! Why won’t she let me do what I want to do? I don’t want to do any work! 

 

Narrator: How do you think he sounds? Lastly, let’s listen to the words he uses.

 

Jack: My teacher keeps telling me to do my work but I don’t want to do my work! I want to play on the computer! Why won’t she let me do what I want to do? I don’t want to do any work!

 

Narrator: Jack is talking a lot about things he doesn’t want to do. How do you think Jack was feeling? Choose one of these emotions: uncomfortable, angry, proud, worried. Jack was feeling… angry! It’s hard to control ourselves when we feel angry. Being angry can feel like

our stomach is upset, our bodies are hot or sweaty, and we have trouble focusing on anything else. When is a time you felt angry? Do you remember what it felt like? How did you make yourself feel better? 

 

Watch Kiara and decide how she’s feeling.

 

Kiara: My neighbor invited me to a barbeque this weekend. I can’t wait to go!

 

Narrator: How does Kiara feel? Let’s look at the clues. Let’s start by looking at her facial expression. Her eyebrows are raised, and she has a big smile on her face. How do you think her facial expression looks? Now, let’s listen and focus on her tone of voice. Is her voice rising or falling? Do you hear any emotions in it? 

 

Kiara: My neighbor invited me to a barbeque this weekend. I can’t wait to go!

 

Narrator: How do you think she sounds? Lastly, let’s listen to the words she uses.

 

Kiara: My neighbor invited me to a barbeque this weekend. I can’t wait to go!

 

Narrator: Kiara says she can’t wait to go to the barbeque. How do you think Kiara was feeling? Choose one of these emotions: nervous, bored, happy, surprised. Kiara was feeling… happy! We can tell from the way her face looked, the way her voice sounded, and the words she told us that she was happy about being invited to the barbeque. How does your body feel and look when you’re happy?

 

Watch Connor and decide how he’s feeling.

 

Connor: My best friend is going to a new school next year so I won’t be able to see him. I’m really going to miss him. Now who am I going to hang out with?

 

Narrator: How does Connor feel? Let’s look at the clues. Let’s start by looking at his facial expression. His eyebrows are lowered, his eyes are looking down, and his mouth is turned down. How do you think his facial expression looks? Now, let’s listen and focus on his tone of voice. Does his voice sound high or low? Loud or soft?

 

Connor: My best friend is going to a new school next year, so I won’t be able to see him. I’m really going to miss him. Now who am I going to hang out with?

 

Narrator: How do you think he sounds? Lastly, let’s listen to the words he uses.

 

Connor: My best friend is going to a new school next year, so I won’t be able to see him. I’m really going to miss him. Now who am I going to hang out with?

 

Narrator: Connor tells us that his best friend is moving and he’s going to miss him. How do you think Connor was feeling? Choose one of these emotions: confused, calm, surprised, sad. Connor was feeling… sad! We can tell Connor looked sad because of his facial expression. His eyes were looking down and his mouth was turned down. His tone of voice also sounded very sad because his voice was low and soft. His words told us that he was sad about not being able to see his friend again. What does it feel like when you feel sad? When is a time you felt sad?

 

Watch Hailey and decide how she’s feeling.

 

Hailey: Whoa! I didn’t think we would win the science fair. I thought that we were good, but I didn’t think we were that good! I can’t believe it!

 

Narrator: How does Hailey feel? Let’s look at the clues. Let’s start by looking at her facial expression. Her eyebrows are raised up, her eyes are wide open, and her mouth is in an open circle. How do you think her facial expression looks? Now, let’s listen and focus on her tone of voice. Does her voice sound high or low? Loud or soft?

 

Hailey: Whoa! I didn’t think we would win the science fair. I thought that we were good, but I didn’t think we were that good! I can’t believe it!

 

Narrator: How do you think she sounds? Lastly, let’s listen to the words she uses.

 

Hailey: Whoa! I didn’t think we would win the science fair. I thought that we were good, but I didn’t think we were that good! I can’t believe it!

 

Narrator: Hailey said she couldn’t believe they won the science fair. What are the clues there? How do you think Hailey was feeling? Choose one of these emotions: upset, surprised, uncomfortable, happy. Hailey was feeling… surprised! We can tell Hailey was feeling surprised by her facial expression. She had raised eyebrows, wide eyes, and an open mouth. Her tone of voice sounded surprised because her voice was a little louder than usual and was rising. Her words told us she didn’t think she was going to win the science fair so we know she was surprised. Have you ever seen somebody look surprised? When? 

 

We saw a lot of different emotions today. Remember, to figure out how someone is feeling, we use all of the clues they give us. We focus on: (1) their facial expression – how do they look? Can we tell how they feel?; (2) their tone of voice – how their voice sounds; (3) and the words they say – what message do their words send? When we put all these clues together, we can tell how someone is feeling!

 

See you next time!

 

Companion Worksheet:

Every video comes with a companion worksheet for students to review what they just learned. This helps assess comprehension and promote generalization by reinforcing the concepts covered in the video.

Videos to teach Tone of Voice

Interactive online games to teach Tone of Voice

Worksheets and activities to teach Tone of Voice

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